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A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs are drugs that are similar to gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmitter, which is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. These analogs act as GABA receptors agonists and cause inhibitory action like GABA.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs are used to treat epilepsy.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs:

  • Alcohol Withdrawal
  • Anxiety
  • Benign Essential Tremor
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Burning Mouth Syndrome
  • Diabetic Nerve Damage
  • Epilepsy
  • Erythromelalgia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Hiccups
  • Hot Flashes
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Insomnia
  • Migraine
  • Migraine Prevention
  • Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced
  • Neuralgia
  • Pain
  • Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Persisting Pain, Shingles
  • Postmenopausal Symptoms
  • Pruritus
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
  • Seizure Prevention
  • Seizures
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Syringomyelia
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Vulvodynia

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Growth hormone receptor blockers are drugs that bind to the growth hormone receptor and make it non-functional. As a result growth hormone cannot exert its effect. These agents are used to control acromegaly.

See also

Medical conditions associated with growth hormone receptor blockers:

  • Acromegaly

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with general anesthetics:

  • Anesthesia
  • Anesthetic Adjunct
  • Coma Induction
  • Head Injury
  • Nausea/Vomiting
  • Nausea/Vomiting, Postoperative
  • Pain
  • Psychosis
  • Sedation
  • Seizures

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Naturally occurring growth hormone (somatotropin) is synthesized and stored in the anterior pituitary gland in the brain. Its release is controlled by opposing actions of growth-hormone releasing hormone and somatostatin.

Growth hormone promotes the growth of long bones in the limbs and increases protein synthesis. A synthetic version of growth hormone, somatropin, is available to treat disorders of growth hormone production or deficiency. It is used to treat growth failure in children.

See also

Medical conditions associated with growth hormones:

  • Adult Human Growth Hormone Deficiency
  • AIDS Related Wasting
  • Burns, Nitrogen Retention
  • Cachexia
  • Growth Retardation, Chronic Renal Failure
  • Hypopituitarism
  • Idiopathic Short Stature
  • Lipodystrophy
  • Noonan's Syndrome
  • Pediatric Growth Hormone Deficiency
  • Short Bowel Syndrome
  • Short Stature for Age
  • Turner's Syndrome

Gastrointestinal agents include many different classes of drugs that are used to treat gastrointestinal disorders.

See also

  • 5-aminosalicylates
  • antacids
  • antidiarrheals
  • digestive enzymes
  • functional bowel disorder agents
    • chloride channel activators
    • peripheral opioid receptor antagonists
    • serotoninergic neuroenteric modulators
  • gallstone solubilizing agents
  • GI stimulants
  • H. pylori eradication agents
  • H2 antagonists
  • laxatives
  • miscellaneous GI agents
  • proton pump inhibitors

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Glucocorticoids are one of the corticosteroids (adrenal cortical steroids) released from the adrenal gland. The physiological stimulus for glucocorticoid release is corticortiotropin (adrenocorticotropic hormone) from the anterior pituitary.

Glucocorticoids are synthesized and released as needed and bind to glucocorticoid receptors.

Glucocorticoids e.g. cortisol and cortisone, are essential for the utilization of carbohydrate, fat and protein by the body and for normal response to stress. Naturally occurring and synthetic glucocorticoids have very powerful anti-inflammatory effects and are used to treat conditions that involve inflammation. They also decrease the body

See also

Medical conditions associated with glucocorticoids:

  • Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia
  • Addison's Disease
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Adrenocortical Insufficiency
  • Adrenogenital Syndrome
  • Allergic Reactions
  • Alopecia
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Aphthous Ulcer
  • Aspiration Pneumonia
  • Asthma
  • Asthma, acute
  • Asthma, Maintenance
  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis
  • Berylliosis
  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
  • Bullous Pemphigoid
  • Bursitis
  • Cerebral Edema
  • Chorioditis
  • Chorioretinitis
  • Cluster Headaches
  • Cogan's Syndrome
  • Conju

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with group IV antiarrhythmics:

  • Angina
  • Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis
  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Atrial Flutter
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Cluster Headaches
  • Heart Failure
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Idiopathic Hypertrophic Subaortic Stenosis
  • Migraine Prevention
  • Nocturnal Leg Cramps
  • Raynaud's Syndrome
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with group I antiarrhythmics:

  • Anesthesia
  • Anxiety
  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Atrial Flutter
  • Burning Mouth Syndrome
  • Diabetic Nerve Damage
  • Epilepsy
  • Malaria
  • Neurosurgery
  • Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Seizures
  • Status Epilepticus
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Ventricular Fibrillation
  • Ventricular Tachycardia
  • Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Gallstone solubilizing agents are used to dissolve small non-calcified gallstones. They suppress the amount of cholesterol synthesized by the liver or inhibit the amount of cholesterol absorbed from the intestines.

They are used to breakdown gallstones in patients, who do not need to have surgery.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gallstone solubilizing agents:

  • Biliary Cirrhosis
  • Gallbladder Disease
  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

*Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists are synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, which is produced by the hypothalamus and controls the secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) by the anterior pituitary. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists bind to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors and decrease the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

In men, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists inhibit the release of luteinizing hormone, and consequently less testosterone is produced. Testosterone stimulates the growth of many forms of prostate cancer. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists are used to treat prostate cancer as by reducing the levels of testosterone the size of prostate cancer is reduced.

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists are used to treat women undergoing fertility treatment. It prevents early release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and premature ovulation in women being administered follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) when preparing for in-vitro fertilization.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists:

  • Gonadotropin Inhibition
  • Ovulation Induction
  • Prostate Cancer

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Gonadotropins are hormones synthesized and released by the anterior pituitary, and act on the gonads (testes and ovaries) to promote production of sex hormones and stimulate production of either sperm or ova. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormones (LH) are the main gonadotropins. Human chorionic gonadotropin is a gonadotropin that is only produced during pregnancy by the placenta.

Gonadotropin production is controlled by gonadotropin-releasing hormone, which is released by the hypothalamus. The effects of gonadotrophins differ in males and females.

Gonadotropins are used in fertility treatment to produce mature follicles and ovulation induction, in women. In men, it is used to increase sperm count as part of fertility treatment.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gonadotropins:

  • Female Infertility
  • Follicle Stimulation
  • Hypogonadism, Male
  • Obesity
  • Ovulation Induction
  • Prepubertal Cryptorchidism

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) reuptake inhibitors are analogs of gamma-Aminobutyric acid that bind to gamma-aminobutyric acid transporters and inhibit GABA reuptake. This increases extracellular levels of GABA and enhances GABA mediated synaptic activity in the brain.

Gamma-Aminobutyric acid reuptake inhibitors are used as anticonvulsant agents to treat epilepsy.

See also

Medical conditions associated with gamma-aminobutyric acid reuptake inhibitors:

  • Seizures

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with group III antiarrhythmics:

  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Atrial Flutter
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia
  • Ventricular Arrhythmia
  • Ventricular Fibrillation
  • Ventricular Tachycardia

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with group V antiarrhythmics:

  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Heart Failure
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia
  • Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Glucose elevating agents are used to treat hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

In diabetics, hypoglycemia can occur as a result of too much insulin or diabetes medicine, not sufficient intake of food, or sudden increase in exercise without increasing the amount of food intake.

See also

Medical conditions associated with glucose elevating agents:

  • Diagnosis and Investigation
  • Hypertensive Emergency
  • Hypoglycemia

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Glycylcyclines are a new generation of antibiotics derived from tetracyclines. They were developed to overcome issues with bacterial resistance to tetracyclines.

Glycylcycline antibiotics inhibit bacterial reproduction by blocking bacterial protein synthesis. They have broad spectrum of activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but are more potent against bacteria that is resistance to tetracyclines. Glycylcycline antibiotics are active against resistant organisms such as methicillin resistant staphylocci, penicillin-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae and vancomycin resistant enterococci.

See also

Medical conditions associated with glycylcyclines:

  • Intraabdominal Infection
  • Pneumonia
  • Skin and Structure Infection
  • Skin Infection

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Glycopeptide antibiotics inhibit bacterial cell wall formation by inhibiting peptidoglycan synthesis. They are used for treating methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and enterococcal infections, which are resistant to beta-lactams and other antibiotics. They are also used in cases where there is allergy to beta-lactams.

See also

Medical conditions associated with glycopeptide antibiotics:

  • Bacteremia
  • Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Bone infection
  • Burns, External
  • Clostridial Infection
  • Endocarditis
  • Enterocolitis
  • Febrile Neutropenia
  • Meningitis
  • Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection
  • Nosocomial Pneumonia
  • Peritonitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease
  • Pseudomembranous Colitis
  • Sepsis
  • Shunt Infection
  • Skin and Structure Infection
  • Skin Infection
  • Surgical Prophylaxis

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

Glycoprotein platelet inhibitors prevent platelet adhesion by binding to the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors on the plasma membrane of platelets. They stop the actual substrates of the glycoprotein receptors from binding to the receptor, so inhibit platelets from sticking together to form a thrombus, which can lead to stroke, myocardial infarction or deep vein thrombosis.

Glycoprotein platelet inhibitors are used in patients with angina, after a heart attack, angioplasty or other types of coronary vasculature procedures.

See also

Medical conditions associated with glycoprotein platelet inhibitors:

  • Acute Coronary Syndrome
  • Angina
  • Heart Attack
  • High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty
  • Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

A drug may be classified by the chemical type of the active ingredient or by the way it is used to treat a particular condition. Each drug can be classified into one or more drug classes.

See also

Medical conditions associated with group II antiarrhythmics:

  • Angina
  • Aortic Stenosis
  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial Fibrillation
  • Atrial Flutter
  • Benign Essential Tremor
  • Heart Attack
  • Hemangioma
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Intra- or Post-op SVT or Hypertension
  • Migraine Prevention
  • Mitral Valve Prolapse
  • Performance Anxiety
  • Pheochromocytoma
  • Premature Ventricular Depolarizations
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia
  • Tardive Dyskinesia
  • Thyrotoxicosis
  • Ventricular Tachycardia